Women Continue Outdoors Trend

Fernandina Beach, FL. – As overall numbers of hunters and anglers have remained relatively steady in recent years, one thing is certain; within that group of adventure-seeking outdoor enthusiasts, the number of women participants continues to climb. Today, women make up more than one-quarter of all anglers (nearly 27 percent), while just over one in 10 hunters (11 percent) are women. As a result of their growing numbers, women hunters and anglers are increasingly a force outdoor businesses are attempting to reach. To help those companies and organizations seeking to understand the modern sportswoman, Southwick Associates has created their annual “Women in the Outdoors in 2015” which is available for free on their website.

Key statistics and findings in the updated report include:
  • Forty-four percent of female anglers who fished freshwater fished for largemouth or spotted bass.
  • Seventy-two percent of female freshwater anglers used artificial lures, the most by far. Second was live bait, used by 59 percent of female anglers.
  • Fifty-six percent of female anglers who fish saltwater do so for any fish that bites.
  • Ninety-six percent of female anglers fish with rod and reel, more than those who fly fish, ice fish, bow fish, noodle or fish with a cane pole combined.
  • Just as with male hunters, the whitetail deer is the most sought after North American game animal by women (60 percent).
  • A higher percentage of men (76 percent) than women (59 percent) shoot rifles, but a larger percentage of women (47 percent) use shotguns than men (43 percent).
  • A larger percentage of women (28 percent) also enjoy archery than men (23 percent).
  • Ammunition was the most purchased hunting/shooting equipment in 2015 by both women (82 percent) and men (83 percent).    Read more

New Rinehart Doloma Coyote Decoy Uses Motion


Janesville, WI – With years of experience in crafting the most lifelike, durable and realistic archery targets in the industry, Rinehart Targets® expands the scope of their brand with the introduction of the new Rinehart Doloma Coyote decoy. The Doloma Coyote, like all Rinehart Decoys, is hand-sculpted by world-class wildlife artists for unmatched realism in both scale and detail.Rinehart has built its reputation on using specialized, durable and life-like material—and the Doloma Coyote is no exception. It features a patented design, ultra-quiet Rinehart foam for silent transport, and an easy-carry compact configuration for nimble treks to and from any hunting location.

In addition to its stunningly realistic looks, the Doloma Coyote’s strongest attribute is its natural head turning—and neck turning—abilities. The unique design allows the decoy to naturally turn its head in the slightest breeze to simulate life-like movement. With multiple ground stake mounting points strategically positioned behind the front legs, breeze-activated movement allows the entire body of the decoy to pivot in addition to the motion of the head and neck. Read more

Rinehart’s New Motion-Focused Whitetail Doe Decoy

GW:  This would be legal in Michigan, because it uses only wind power to move the head.

Janesville, WI – With years of experience in crafting the most lifelike, durable and realistic archery targets in the industry, Rinehart Targets® expands the scope of their brand with the introduction of the new Rinehart Doloma Doe decoy. The new Doloma Doe, like all Rinehart Decoys, is hand-sculpted by world-class wildlife artists for unmatched realism.

Rinehart has built its reputation on using specialized, durable and life-like material—and the Doloma Doe is no exception. She features a patented design, ultra-quiet Rinehart foam for silent transport and an easy-carry folding configuration for nimble treks to and from any hunting location.

Aside from her stunningly realistic looks, the Doloma Doe’s strongest attribute is her natural head turning—and neck turning—abilities. The capability to naturally turn her head in the slightest breeze to simulate life-like movement will draw in the wariest of bucks. With the anchor rod strategically positioned behind the front legs, breeze-activated movement allows the entire body of the decoy to pivot in addition to the motion of the head and neck. The patented Doloma Doe comes with a full-carry bag that’s crafted with a “quiet-tech” fabric and features a drawstring and a shoulder strap for comfortable and stealthy transport.

From the decoy design to the carry bag, Rinehart tweaked every detail in the field to create a decoy that’s designed and proven by hunters, for hunters. The key to a consistently successful decoy is realism and movement, and the Doloma Doe from Rinehart is turning heads in both these categories.

Specifications:
Height: 29 ¼ inches
Length: 49 inches
Simulated Weight: 95 pounds
Actual Weight: 8 pounds
Tool-less Assembly and Set-Up
Constructed of Exclusive Quite Rinehart Foam
Includes Quiet Carry Bag

MSRP for the Rinehart Doloma Doe decoy is $159.99

For more product information and media inquiries, please contact Glenn Walker, glenn@providencemarketinggroup.net

About Rinehart Targets:
Since 1999 Rinehart Targets has been manufacturing the best 3D archery targets on the market, and Rinehart expanded their offerings with the introduction of the Doloma Decoys. A combination of quality, durability and unique offerings makes all Rinehart products one of a kind and true in both scale and detail thanks to Rinehart’s award-winning team of wildlife sculptors. Rinehart’s diverse target line has been extremely well received by all levels of archery shooters and will continue to introduce cutting-edge technology in the future.

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Turkey Hunting and Wildlife Watching

By Glen Wunderlich

The alarm was set to become obnoxious at 4:30 am, but I was already up. The workman-like routine entailed making a tank of coffee, a sandwich, and a covert retreat to my spacious turkey blind. The fourth morning of the late turkey season had me wondering what type of wildlife antics would unfold before my eyes; the first three sessions did not disappoint.

First, the setup. An old hoop blind – the type that is impossible to twist back into toting shape – and large enough to accommodate two occupants and/or gear. In this case, I’d be hunting alone, so a tripod and consumer-grade Canon Vixia movie camera would occupy the window to my left.

The chosen site is in heavy soil and, as often the case in springtime, it’s wet. To combat the moisture, a layer of plastic is put down with a moving blanket over the top. Poof. A comfy living space for a long morning.

The enclosed blind keeps me and my gear dry, and before wondering what type of wimp I’ve become, I don’t know anyone who’d sit in the rain for 6 hours and risk ruining cameras. The innate beauty of even an old, sun scorched, off-color hideout is that it allows a hunter to laugh at the weather and dumbfounded animals.

I mention dumbfounded, because that’s the impulse of whitetail deer that come upon a lifeless, synthetic, but otherwise seemingly normal turkey.

Something's not right about this

Something’s not right about this

They’ll stomp their hooves and jump around in an effort to elicit some type of response. Nothing. Never. But, it sure gives me a phenomenal close-up view of the health of the local herd. A bevy of bucks sport giraffe-like antlers covered in velvet and travel together in a group. They sure seem to appreciate those luscious legumes we planted for them last fall.

And, then a coyote appears sunlit atop a ridge and standing broadside only 100 yards away. Dang it. Sure would like to save a few fawns by taking it out, but another day. Another day for sure. Today, I’m after drumsticks.

It’s easy to forget the purpose sometimes, however. Eastern bluebirds, crows, sandhill cranes, catbirds, robins, and even a few geese to keep this birder’s eyes and ears occupied. And, while aiming the camera at a couple of Canada geese, a hurried noise erupts to my right.

Here comes one outraged turkey hen marching purposefully toward my cheap rubber accomplice. So, when is the last time you’ve seen a live performance of the Mexican Hat Dance? Several complete agitated circles around the intruder and a few more choice utterances, and the satisfied boss hen ate a path into the field right in front of me. And, it’s all going on Youtube (in due time).

Pulling the trigger on a gobbler would be anticlimactic. It always is. But, for now, the show goes on.

Michigan Approves Year-round Coyote Hunting

By Glen Wunderlich

With Michigan’s deer numbers on the decline and our coyote population on the rise, our Natural Resources Commission (NRC) has taken a bold step to combat this disappointing trend by lifting protections on coyotes. Effective immediately, coyote hunting season is open year-round in Michigan, thus bringing us in line with other states in the Midwest region. In addition, raccoons, opossums, foxes and coyotes now may be taken at night with number 3 and 4 buckshot.

Coyote Pup Taken with Lapua Sub-Sonic .22 Ammo

Coyote Pup Taken with Lapua Sub-Sonic .22 Ammo

Nighttime furbearers can be taken with a bow and arrow, crossbow, a rimfire firearm .22 caliber or smaller, or a shotgun with loads other than buckshot larger than number 3, slug or cut shell. Centerfire rifles still may not be used to take furbearers at night.

These refreshing changes to common-sense game management tools couldn’t come at a more appropriate time, insofar as Michigan’s new crop of fawns will begin to be born at any time. It is the first 10 days of a fawn’s life, when fawns are most vulnerable to predators and when coyotes do the most damage to our deer herd.

A newborn fawn’s only defense against attack is to remain motionless, while it instinctively calms its heartbeat from 175 beats per minute to about 60 beats. The slower and deeper breathing has the effect of reducing airborne scent in an effort to remain “invisible” to predators’ noses.

Often, humans will encounter newborn fawns bedded, because that’s what they do for some 95 percent of the first 10 days or so. It’s important to understand that the mother doe has not abandoned her offspring, but will return to nurse her fawns during the day. If ever we should adopt a hands-off policy for wildlife, it is at this precarious time in the life of a deer.

However, spring is also the time that mated pairs of coyotes are not only feeding themselves but 4 to 7 of their pups. Opportunistic coyotes are omnivorous and will eat about anything including small mammals, plants, and insects. Defenseless fawns, however, are always on the spring menu.

If you choose to hunt coyotes, here are the remaining rules to keep in mind.

*Dogs may not be used to hunt coyotes April 16 through July 7.

*Nighttime hunting season dates now match the daytime hunting season dates by species. No longer do we have conflicting dates just because we may choose to hunt at night.

*Portable artificial lights may be used throughout the open nighttime season of the target species.

*Nighttime hunters must use the aid of a game or predator call and/or dogs while hunting at night. Dogs may not be used from April 16 through July 7. While hunting with dogs at night, a firearm, crossbow or bow and arrow may be loaded at the point of kill only.

*To hunt coyotes, Michigan residents must have a valid base license, and nonresidents must have a valid base license and a valid fur harvester license. Residents hunting other furbearing species will need a base license and a fur harvester license.

* A license or written permit is not needed. Raccoons and coyotes may be taken all year on private property by a property owner or designee when the raccoons or coyotes are doing or about to do damage to private property.

I am left with one wish: to learn the difference between a coyote with good intentions and one determined to do damage. For now, I’ll have to be content with some head scratching.

Lion Kill Fest: The Impact of the HSUS Ideology

When the “Cecil” the lion issue took place last summer, the Humane Society of the United States, the largest animal-rights organization in the country, fought to end the importation of lion trophies to the United States under the guise of protecting the remaining “endangered” population (an action the Sportsmen’s Alliance fought).

HSUS won that battle in part (but not in full, as explained below). Lion trophy importation from Zimbabwe (where the Cecil incident occurred) has effectively ended (although the door has not yet been conclusively slammed shut). But, as the Sportsmen’s Alliance said would happen, the consequence of shutting down trophy imports from Zimbabwe has had the opposite effect of what HSUS claimed – as now unsustainable populations of lions will likely face slaughter as new rules shut down the flow of money from U.S. trophy hunters.Lion-By Rumpleteaser (FlickrCC) sized for web

Currently, at least 200 lions are being considered for culling because of an unsustainable management paradigm – overpopulation and no revenue stream for continued support. And a revenue stream it is.

If just those 200 lions are killed, that’s a loss of $10 million dollars to just one area’s anti-poaching efforts, habitat conservation and acquisition, academic studies and all associated ancillary benefits to the local economy and people. The shortsighted and unsustainable rhetoric of the Humane Society of the United States and other animal-rights “warriors” is leading to more bloodshed in the form of economic and intrinsic loss of wildlife in Africa in mere months than has ever been spilled by hunters.

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